Tag Archives: book review

Book review: ‘Cast of Characters’

We tend to skim over familiar Bible stories, or see the characters as two-dimensional because the Bible lacks details like we find in novels. We know what they did, but the depth of the anguish that was behind their action or decision is not obvious. We don’t spend the mental effort exploring what these characters might have been thinking.

Max Lucado does that in “Cast of Characters.” He does an exceptional job taking you into the minds of these characters, where you feel their depth of emotion, the anguish, the joy, and the pain. The Biblical principle is the main point of each chapter. In some cases, resetting the story is a tool Lucado uses to make it easier to see and apply the principles to our own lives.

Lucado’s writing style tends to be more reflective and inspirational than the practical “how to” books to which I’m drawn. If you don’t like his writing style or want a historically-accurate perspective on these characters, read something else. But I found three or four chapters that really resonated with my own life, and now I have a model to bring other Biblical characters to life.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews, Christianity, Church, Faith

Book Review: ‘After The Hangover’ by R. Emmett Tyrrell

R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr.’s latest book, “After the Hangover,” is an insightful perspective from a key “player” on the historical and current state of the conservative political movement. Filled with personal anecdotes from the author’s decades in the movement, Tyrrell confronts the discouragement felt by many conservatives today with an optimistic look at the conservative agenda and its resurgence in popularity.

Tyrrell’s status in the movement for many decades is both a blessing and a curse. For those people who just recently jumped into the conservative fight, the significant chunk of space he spends providing a history of the movement is helpful. However, he tosses names around like old friends, but often assumes the reader has some prior knowledge of who those people are.

I found the writing style a bit over the top. Why use a simple, understandable word when one requiring the use of a dictionary will do? He also spends an unnecessarily large amount of space on an extended tribute to one of the conservative movement’s great leaders, William F. Buckley, Jr.  I thoroughly enjoyed the discussion of the conservative agenda for recovery, which included specific plans for financial and health care reforms, key domestic policies such as education, immigration and energy and national defense. Despite the book’s minor shortcomings, I would heartily recommend it for its informative, witty and insightful message that’s full of hope for the future.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews, Conservative